Charge at Home

Charging an electric car at home is easy.

The Perks of Home Charging.

Got an outlet? Your home is electric car ready!

If you have a basic 120-volt outlet, you're ready to charge the moment you arrive at home with your new electric vehicle – no special equipment needed. Every new EV comes standard with a level 1 charging cord.

Fuel up your electric car while you sleep.

Why not treat your car like you do your smart phone? Plug in when you get home, schedule it to charge overnight, and wake up at 100% — a great way to start your day, with no stopping off at the gas station on the way to work.

Better utilize renewable energy sources.

Did you know that between 8 pm and 6 am, when electric vehicles typically charge, is the time when renewable energy sources are at their highest utilization in the grid? Moreover, Evergy has set a goal for Net-Zero Carbon Emissions by 2045 by making even more significant investments in renewable energy.

Pre-cool without leaving your garage.

It’s a cold winter morning, and you want your car to be all toasty when you get in (or cool in the summer). EVs don’t need to “start their engine” to do this, so you can start warming them up from your phone without worrying about filling your garage with exhaust (because no tailpipe).

Dramatically reduce your fuel budget.

Ready to reduce your gas budget? You’ll find that you can cut your fuel costs by driving an EV, with electricity costing a fraction of what gasoline would to travel an equal distance. Also, charging at home is the most economical way to charge an EV, with home electricity rates at about half the cost of public charging rates.

How to Charge with a Standard Outlet at Home.

  • Charging an Electric Vehicle in Your Garage

    Step 1: Park in your garage or driveway.

    As long as your cord can reach a 120-volt outlet, electric vehicles can charge inside or outside. Yes, even in the rain or snow. If you don't have a garage, you can use an outlet on the outside of your house. Some EV drivers get more creative – like running a cord out a window!

  • 120 volt electric vehicle charging cord

    Step 2: Take out the level 1 charging cord.

    Known as Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE), a Level 1 charging cord comes standard with every new electric vehicle. You'll probably find it in your trunk or frunk (front trunk). It has a standard 3-prong plug on one end, a charge current interrupting device (CCID) in the cord, and a larger vehicle connector on the other end.

  • Charge your electric vehicle using a 120 volt outlet.

    Step 3: Plug into a 120-volt outlet.

    You can plug the 3-prong end of a Level 1 cord into any standard grounded outlet. Typical voltage ratings can be from 110 – 120 volts AC and amp ratings for these are 15 or 20 amps. A 15 amp charge may take twice as long as a 20 amp outlet. 

  • Plug In Your Electric Car

    Step 4: Connect to your car’s charging port.

    Plug the larger end into your vehicle’s inlet charging port. In most EVs, this is a J1772 connector, a standard design specified by the Society of Automotive Engineers. These connectors include safety features such as an interlocking device that prevents vehicle startup while connected.

  • Electric vehicle charging indicator light

    Step 5: Beep, beep, blink.

    Your indicator light blinks to verify the vehicle is charging. You’ll get up to five miles of range per hour of charging. Like your phone, you can charge overnight while you sleep. The next day, just unplug, put away the cord, and drive away.

Want to Charge Quicker? Install a 240-volt Outlet.

Level 2 Home Charging: What you’ll need.

  • Home electrical breaker box

    Dedicated Circuit

    If you are having a new outlet installed, it is recommended you have a dedicated 240-volt , 40 amp or greater, electrical circuit. Check to see if you have room in your breaker box. If you have extra slots, you can simply add a circuit. In some cases, older homes that have a 100 amp panel will need to upgrade to 200 amp service.

  • 240-volt outlet

    240-volt Outlet

    Similar to one used for an appliance, you will need a 240-volt outlet: either a NEMA 14-50 or 6-50. The cost to install an outlet can be as low as $200. However, when you need to have circuits added and wiring run, the average is closer to $600. If you need a panel upgrade, add about $2,000. 

  • ChargePoint Home Charger

    Level 2 Equipment

    Unless your EV comes with one, you will likely either need to buy a portable level 2 charging cord EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment) or a fixed box that gets mounted on the wall. Wall boxes aren't very big and come in versions that can either just plug into a nearby 240-volt outlet or be hardwired to your house.  Portable level 2 cords cost about $200–$300 and wall boxes average $500–$700.

Level 2 Home Charging: How to Charge.

  • Charging an Electric Vehicle in Your Garage

    Step 1: Park in your garage or driveway.

    Most Level 2 equipment is available in a variety of cord lengths, so if you want, you can have one long enough to run from the garage out into the driveway. You may have a 240-volt outlet in your garage, or you could even have weather-safe equipment outside your home. 

  • ChargePoint Home Charger

    Step 2: Use a portable cord or wall box.

    Either plug in your level 2 portable charging cord into a 240-volt outlet or if you have a wall box, remove the connecter from its holster.

    Some Level 2 EVSEs come with features such as wifi connectivity, enabling you to do things like schedule charging and see actual electricity costs for each charging session.

  • ChargePoint Home Charger

    Step 3: Connect to your car’s charging port.

    Plug the connector into your vehicle’s same inlet charging port as you would for Level 1. In most EVs, this is a J1772 connector, a standard design specified by the Society of Automotive Engineers. These connectors include safety features such as an interlocking device that prevents vehicle startup while connected.

  • Electric vehicle charging indicator light

    Step 4: Beep, beep, blink.

    Your indicator light blinks to verify the vehicle is charging. You’ll get approximately 25 miles of range per hour of charging. If you are on Evergy's Time of Use plan, you can schedule charging to not start until after 8 pm, when rates are cheaper. When done charging, just unplug and drive away.

Time to Charge 40 Miles of Range.

Did you know that the average U.S. commute is 40 miles per day?
Here's what it would take to replenish that range at home.

Level 1 (120-volt outlet)

8 Hours

Charge Time

40 Miles of Range

Level 2 (240-volt outlet)

1 1/2 Hours

Charge Time

40 Miles of Range

Cost to Charge 40 Miles of Range.

KANSAS Metro

KANSAS Central

Missouri

$0

Residential rate

$.1075 / kwh

$

Time of Use Rate

When charged between 12–6am

$0

Residential rate

$.1075 / kwh

$

Time of Use Rate

When charged between 12–6am

$

Residential rate

$.138 / kwh

$0

Time of Use Rate

When charged between 12–6am

Charging can cost even less after hours.

Our Time of Use Plan is an optional rate plan that rewards you with rate discounts when you shift energy usage away from peak hours. Schedule your electric vehicle to charge between 8 pm and 6 am to save even more on fuel costs.

Wait 'til 8